The former CBS chief Leslie Moonves will have to do without after allegations of sexual harassment to a severance payment in the amount equivalent to 106 million euros (120 million dollars). As a justification of the Board of Directors of the American TV channel called, among other things, a violation of company policy and a breach of his contract of employment. In addition, Moonves had failed to cooperate with the investigations of the company, informed the station.

Moonves was transferred after allegations of sexual harassment in September as group chief Executive of CBS. The company had communicated at the time, he’ll get his severance pay only, if this should prove to be false.

problem acknowledged

About a dozen women had accused the former CBS chief harassment and sexual attacks. Moonves had admitted in the past, friendly contacts with some of the women, and misconduct given. “I recognize that there were decades ago, times in which I put some women through advances in embarrassment,” he had announced in the summer, in a statement. He regret enormously. At the same time, Moonves assured that he had always “understood and respected”, “the ‘no’ means no”.

His lawyer, Andrew Levander, to be referred to the estimates made by the management as “unfounded”. “Mr Moonves denies any consensual sexual relationships and has been cooperating fully with investigators,” said Levander, in a statement to various US media.

success for CBS

The 69-year-old Moonves had made initially as a TV producer a name and was then, in 1995, came to CBS. The group’s leadership he took over in 2006. With series like “The Big Bang Theory” and “CSI,” CBS, in his tenure a number of successes, by the transmitter came out of a quota of slack. Last year, CBS was the most-watched network in the United States.

According to the Hollywood producers Harvey Weinstein, the many women accused of sexual Assault, Moonves is another powerful man in the entertainment industry whose career has been ended by revelations and allegations in the Wake of the #MeToo movement.

brs/dpa

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