Korean-military-looks-into-privileged-treatment-scandal
A South Korean conscript is accused of using a private room, having an assistant to do his laundry, and regularly going AWOL to dine with his family thanks to his parents’ wealth. Photo courtesy of Air Force

NICE Group vice chairman’s son comes under suspicion

A South Korean conscript is accused of using a private room, having an assistant to do his laundry, and regularly going AWOL to dine with his family thanks to his parents’ wealth.

The suspicion surfaced last week when an online petition was posted at the presidential office website about an Air Force serviceman in Seoul, who enjoyed above-mentioned preferential treatments.

In the face of public anger, the Air Force said this week that it would investigate the airman although he is presently on vacation because of a skin disease.

Korean media outlets report that the soldier, surnamed Choi, is the son of a Nice Group vice chairman. The group is a credit information conglomerate.

According to the petition, Choi did not have to wash his clothes because his family assistant took his laundry every Saturday and bring it back after being washed.

A non-commissioned officer allegedly had to deliver the laundry.

The petitioner also claimed that Choi used a room of his own at the barracks compared to other enlistees, who typically share a room with several companions.

Another allegation is that Choi made off-installation travels citing medical treatment _ but the petitioner suspected that in fact Choi had dinner with his family while off base.

The petition about the preferential treatments caused controversies across the nation because ordinary conscripts cannot savor similar benefits.

In Korea, able men between the age of 18 and 28 should serve at least 18 months in the military.